Unusual Jewellery

Saturday, 14 December 2019

Kand L Top jewellery brands

K and L Top Jewellery Brands.

Here is our brand's information for jewellery. From designer to the unknown. Each small piece of information that I have been gathered to help you identify your own preowned and vintage jewellery. Looking at the back or on tags or on boxes they are in. The photos are to help you more visually. They are our own that we have had in stock or now sold. Arranged alphabetically (sort of) 


Kaywin Novelty Jewelry - Late 1920s to the mid-1940s. New York company set up by Dan Kosoff and Marty Weiner. This was Dan Kosoff's first business before he went onto Florenza. The name is an amalgamation of parts of both of their names. They made jewellery including many dress clips and accessories with buttons, buckles and brooch chatelaines being popular. Rhinestones, beads, cabochon and brass stampings were used with findings and embellishments that were sold at that time. Signed "Kaywin Nov NY" mostly, but also "Kaywin" on its own.

Keyes - a Canadian company that was based in Montreal. The 1940s to the 1990s production of high-end costume jewellery also known as fake jewellery. Friends of the Keyes included Marcel Boucher and Sherman.

Kigu of London - Kigu manufactured compacts for which it was famous for as well as a small range of Kigu jewellery. They also produced enamelled pillboxes, folding mirrors, combs, clocks and other handbag type accessories

The first powder compact was created by Josef Kiaschek in Hungary. Gustav Kiaschek, his son went on to start the company KI-GU in Budapest.

Gustav's three sons emigrated around the world. George arrived in London in 1939 and founded Kigu of London. The war stopped production as with most of the manufacturing companies in the UK. All the factories concentrated on production for the war effort. Paul his brother joined the company after World War 11 in 1947. After George died in 1977, his son David joined the company until the early eighties when the company was sold to another compact firm called A S Brown who produced the range of Mascot compacts. Later Laughton & Sons (Stratton) took both the Kigu and Mascot brands and amalgamated it with their own famous brand Stratton.

Jewellery produced by Kigu is well made and seems to have been produced from the fifties. They produced some gorgeous cuff bracelets, earrings and necklaces in the fifties. A range of simulated marcasite in earrings and matching brooches called Marquetta produced in the 1950s. This jewellery was rhodium-plated or 22 ct gold plated. Some of the range were hand enamelled in three alternative colours. The earrings were either clip on, screw or in French wire form. The clipped earrings have a very distinctive clip finding not seen on any other earrings. Production continued into the eighties. The mark used is Kigu
For some photographs of their jewellery and the Marquetta range. Also extensive information with photographs on the Kigu compacts and other accessories visit their informative website. 
Kigu of London - Kigu manufactured compacts for which it was famous for as well as a small range of Kigu jewellery. They also produced enamelled pillboxes, folding mirrors, combs, clocks and other handbag type accessories

The first powder compact was created by Josef Kiaschek in Hungary. Gustav Kiaschek, his son went on to start the company KI-GU in Budapest.
Gustav's three sons emigrated around the world. George arrived in London in 1939 and founded Kigu of London. The war stopped production as with most of the manufacturing companies in the UK. All the factories concentrated on production for the war effort. Paul his brother joined the company after World War 11 in 1947. After George died in 1977, his son David joined the company until the early eighties when the company was sold to another compact firm called A S Brown who produced the range of Mascot compacts. Later Laughton & Sons (Stratton) took both the Kigu and Mascot brands and amalgamated it with their own famous brand Stratton.

Jewellery produced by Kigu is well made and seems to have been produced from the fifties. They produced some gorgeous cuff bracelets, earrings and necklaces in the fifties. A range of simulated marcasite in earrings and matching brooches called Marquetta produced in the 1950s. This jewellery was rhodium-plated or 22 ct gold plated. Some of the range were hand enamelled in three alternative colours. The earrings were either clip on, screw or in French wire form. The clipped earrings have a very distinctive clip finding not seen on any other earrings. Production continued into the eighties. The mark used is Kigu

For some photographs of their jewellery and the Marquetta range. Also, extensive information with photographs on the Kigu compacts and other accessories visit their informative website. 
 
King Henry William Birmingham UK/London silversmiths & jewellery maker Victorian to? See Shiptons also. Mark on silver was H W K. Arts and Crafts include landscaped boxes.

King Jessie M - Scottish Glaswegian born and worked for Liberty. Known for her Mackintosh inspired birds with flora enamelled silver buckle work.

Kisumu - Contemporary and original. Started to trade via Facebook. Now under Amber jewellery, who only sell wholesale

Kramer - 1943 - 1970s/80s. New York company started by Louis Kramer.  Joined by his brothers Harry and Morris. Made costume pieces in enamel, gilt metal and Swarovski and Austrian crystals. Usually signed Kramer, Kramer of New York or Kramer NY. In the 1950s and 1960s, they worked with Dior. These pieces are stamped Christian Dior by Kramer, Dior by Kramer or Kramer by Dior. Parure or sets of jewellery are the most collectable and sought after from this company.

Krystal, London - 1980s to today. Produces Swarovski crystal-encrusted handcrafted jewellery made in the UK. The tag has Krystal London on and on the reverse the designer Kish.

Lalique Rene 1888 - today For a more in-depth account see the Rene Lalique information link.

Lane Kenneth J (KJL) - Kenneth Jay Lane 1932 - 2017, Started out in 1963 when working for high-end stores in America. First took ordinary plastic bangles and sold them outside the store he was working in. Progressing to selling his jewellery to the Duchess of Windsor. He copied high-end real jewellery and made them in costume. Starts and politician wives loved to wear them. It was safer than wearing more expensive ones. In the 90s, sold on QVC. His company is still in business today. 

Lambourne's Company founded in Birmingham UK. 

Lee Judy 1950s - 1970s - House party company selling in the home. From the company Blanch-Ette that was founded in 1958. Judy Lee was the trademark that they used. Not so well known or available. they are worthy of collecting now. The company used unique designs and very good quality findings or stones.
 
L C - see Claiborne Liz.

Liberty Arthur Lasenby - In 1875 he opened a small shop in London's Regent Street. First, he sold oriental fabrics and good - so the shop was called "East India House" By 1885, the shop was doing very well and had become a lot bigger. Arthur Liberty had also now started to included English designers to create fabrics, fashion and furniture amongst other products. In the 1890s, silver and pewter jewellery & other products were sold under the trade names "Tudric" and "Cymric". By the early 1900s, he had also included European products into the now Liberty & Co. Celtic designs attributed to Archibald Knox. Oliver Baker and Jessie M King were another two jewellery designers that worked for Liberty. However, Liberty insisted on having a policy of anonymity for the designers.    

Lin - Bangkok, Thailand wholesale to suppliers. Started in 1985 and now sell worldwide both jewellery and fancy goods. All are in silver.  


Links of London
Links of London oval box for cufflinks

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